Beyond "learning to code": How Tech Learning Collective merges IT training with emancipatory political action

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"What good is a pen if the paper it touches can refuse to show its ink? What good is your app when your API key is revoked? Through metaphor and with a unique apprenticeship-based pedagogy, Tech Learning Collective (TLC) is empowering users by doing exactly what code boot camps and corporate-funded "learn to code" programs don't: TLC tells students to ignore new Web frameworks and focus instead on the lowest layers of an IT stack like physical network and hardware storage devices."

Original story by LibrePlanet 2021 and the Free Software Foundation. Published 2021-03-22, Originally published 2021-03-21.
This work is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike license.


Video Copyright LibrePlanet 2021 / Free Software Foundation. License: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike

At TLC, infrastructure is the heart of a free software curriculum eschewing common rush-to-employment training paradigms in favor of Socratic classrooms where practicing Bash commands seamlessly meld with lectures about Gnostic influences on Ethernet, the relationship between Gregorian chants and bootloaders, and more. Come see why and how TLC's holistic approach to IT education is creating communities of activist sysadmins out of people who wouldn't otherwise have called themselves "techies."

"Tech Learning Collective is an apprenticeship-based technology school for radical organizers headquartered in New York City that provides a security-first IT infrastructure curriculum to otherwise underserved communities and organizations advancing social justice causes. We train politically self-motivated individuals in the arts of hypermedia, Information Technology, and radical political practice.

Founded and operated exclusively by radical queer and femme technologists, we offer unparalleled free, by-donation, and low-cost computer classes on topics ranging from fundamental computer literacy to the same offensive computer hacking techniques used by national intelligence agencies and military powers (cyber armies)."

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