LinuxReviws.org --get your your Linux knowledge
> Linux Reviews >

Windows 2k/XP

Some random information about Windows


  1. Best Windows Media Player
  2. Hide files in the filesystem
  3. Mount CD-Rom images (.bin/.img) as filesystems
  4. Logging into Linux boxes from Windows using sshd
  5. Crash the Windows NT kernel


1. Best Windows Media Player

MPlayer (manual /man/mplayer) is known to be the best Linux media player.

It supports almost all known media formats and has excellent error-correction when playing broken files.

A Windows version of MPlayer is available.

2. Hide files in the filesystem

From "The Dark Side of NTFS (Microsoft?s Scarlet Letter)" by H. Carvey:

Introduction

Microsoft platforms continue to proliferate and multiply. Corporate server and desktop systems are running Windows NT (NT) and Windows 2000 (2K), while home user and student systems are running Windows XP (XP). These platforms are extremely popular, and in widespread use. However, very little is known by the administrators and users of these systems about a feature of the NTFS file system called "alternate data streams".

NTFS is the preferred file system due to its stability, functionality, and the level of security it provides. NTFS alternate data streams (ADSs) are provided for compatibility with the Macintosh Hierarchical File System (HFS), which uses resource forks to maintain information associated with a file, such as icons, etc (RUSS00). While Microsoft provides a means for creating specific ADSs via Windows Explorer, the necessary tools and functionality for detecting the presence of arbitrary ADSs is conspicuously absent. Oddly enough, the operating systems have the necessary native functionality and tools to allow a user to create ADSs and to execute code hidden within those streams. Microsoft KnowledgeBase article Q101353 acknowledges the fact that the Win32 base API supports ADSs inconsistently.

3. Mount CD-Rom images (.bin/.img) as filesystems

To do this you need DAEMON Tools. Download from www.daemon-tools.cc.

4. Logging into Linux boxes from Windows using sshd

This is explained at:

5. Crash the Windows NT kernel

Try this infamous code on a Windows NT kernel. (WinNT,2k,XP etc.). (I don't know if it has been yet fixed)

      #include <stdio.h>
  
      int main (void) {
      while (1)
      printf ("\t\t\b\b\b\b\b\b");
  
      return 0;
      } 

Meet new people