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hostname

show or set the system's host name


  1. hostname.1.man
  2. hostname.7.man


1. hostname.1.man

Manpage of HOSTNAME

HOSTNAME

Section: Linux System Administrator's Manual (1)
Updated: 2008-10-03
Index Return to Main Contents

 

NAME

hostname - show or set the system's host name
domainname - show or set the system's NIS/YP domain name
dnsdomainname - show the system's DNS domain name
nisdomainname - show or set system's NIS/YP domain name
ypdomainname - show or set the system's NIS/YP domain name
nodename - show or set the system's DECnet node name

 

SYNOPSIS

hostname [-v] [-a] [--alias] [-d] [--domain] [-f] [--fqdn] [-i] [--ip-address] [--long] [-s] [--short] [-y] [--yp] [--nis] [-n] [--node]

hostname [-v] [-F filename] [--file filename] [hostname]

domainname [-v] [-F filename] [--file filename] [name]

nodename [-v] [-F filename] [--file filename] [name]

hostname [-v] [-h] [--help] [-V] [--version]

dnsdomainname [-v]
nisdomainname [-v]
ypdomainname [-v]

 

DESCRIPTION

Hostname is the program that is used to either set or display the current host, domain or node name of the system. These names are used by many of the networking programs to identify the machine. The domain name is also used by NIS/YP.

 

GET NAME

When called without any arguments, the program displays the current names:

hostname will print the name of the system as returned by the gethostname(2) function.

domainname, nisdomainname, ypdomainname will print the name of the system as returned by the getdomainname(2) function. This is also known as the YP/NIS domain name of the system.

nodename will print the DECnet node name of the system as returned by the getnodename(2) function.

dnsdomainname will print the domain part of the FQDN (Fully Qualified Domain Name). The complete FQDN of the system is returned with hostname --fqdn.

 

SET NAME

When called with one argument or with the --file option, the commands set the host name, the NIS/YP domain name or the node name.

Note, that only the super-user can change the names.

It is not possible to set the FQDN or the DNS domain name with the dnsdomainname command (see THE FQDN below).

The host name is usually set once at system startup in /etc/rc.d/rc.inet1 or /etc/init.d/boot (normally by reading the contents of a file which contains the host name, e.g. /etc/hostname).

 

THE FQDN

You can't change the FQDN (as returned by hostname --fqdn) or the DNS domain name (as returned by dnsdomainname) with this command. The FQDN of the system is the name that the resolver(3) returns for the host name.

Technically: The FQDN is the name gethostbyname(2) returns for the host name returned by gethostname(2). The DNS domain name is the part after the first dot.

Therefore it depends on the configuration (usually in /etc/host.conf) how you can change it. Usually (if the hosts file is parsed before DNS or NIS) you can change it in /etc/hosts.

 

OPTIONS

-a, --alias
Display the alias name of the host (if used).
-d, --domain
Display the name of the DNS domain. Don't use the command domainname to get the DNS domain name because it will show the NIS domain name and not the DNS domain name. Use dnsdomainname instead.
-F, --file filename
Read the host name from the specified file. Comments (lines starting with a `#') are ignored.
-f, --fqdn, --long
Display the FQDN (Fully Qualified Domain Name). A FQDN consists of a short host name and the DNS domain name. Unless you are using bind or NIS for host lookups you can change the FQDN and the DNS domain name (which is part of the FQDN) in the /etc/hosts file.
-h, --help
Print a usage message and exit.
-i, --ip-address
Display the IP address(es) of the host.
-n, --node
Display the DECnet node name. If a parameter is given (or --file name ) the root can also set a new node name.
-s, --short
Display the short host name. This is the host name cut at the first dot.
-V, --version
Print version information on standard output and exit successfully.
-v, --verbose
Be verbose and tell what's going on.
-y, --yp, --nis
Display the NIS domain name. If a parameter is given (or --file name ) then root can also set a new NIS domain.
 

FILES

/etc/hosts  

AUTHOR

Peter Tobias, <tobias@et-inf.fho-emden.de>
Bernd Eckenfels, <net-tools@lina.inka.de> (NIS and manpage).
Steve Whitehouse, <SteveW@ACM.org> (DECnet support and manpage).


 

Index

NAME
SYNOPSIS
DESCRIPTION
GET NAME
SET NAME
THE FQDN
OPTIONS
FILES
AUTHOR

This document was created by man2html using the manual pages.
Time: 17:31:11 GMT, October 23, 2013

2. hostname.7.man

Manpage of HOSTNAME

HOSTNAME

Section: Linux Programmer's Manual (7)
Updated: 2010-11-07
Index Return to Main Contents
 

NAME

hostname - hostname resolution description  

DESCRIPTION

Hostnames are domains, where a domain is a hierarchical, dot-separated list of subdomains; for example, the machine monet, in the Berkeley subdomain of the EDU domain would be represented as "monet.Berkeley.EDU".

Hostnames are often used with network client and server programs, which must generally translate the name to an address for use. (This task is generally performed by either getaddrinfo(3) or the obsolete gethostbyname(3).) Hostnames are resolved by the Internet name resolver in the following fashion.

If the name consists of a single component, that is, contains no dot, and if the environment variable HOSTALIASES is set to the name of a file, that file is searched for any string matching the input hostname. The file should consist of lines made up of two white-space separated strings, the first of which is the hostname alias, and the second of which is the complete hostname to be substituted for that alias. If a case-insensitive match is found between the hostname to be resolved and the first field of a line in the file, the substituted name is looked up with no further processing.

If the input name ends with a trailing dot, the trailing dot is removed, and the remaining name is looked up with no further processing.

If the input name does not end with a trailing dot, it is looked up by searching through a list of domains until a match is found. The default search list includes first the local domain, then its parent domains with at least 2 name components (longest first). For example, in the domain CS.Berkeley.EDU, the name lithium.CChem will be checked first as lithium.CChem.CS.Berkeley.EDU and then as lithium.CChem.Berkeley.EDU. Lithium.CChem.EDU will not be tried, as there is only one component remaining from the local domain. The search path can be changed from the default by a system-wide configuration file (see resolver(5)).  

SEE ALSO

gethostbyname(3), resolver(5), mailaddr(7), named(8)  

COLOPHON

This page is part of release 3.32 of the Linux man-pages project. A description of the project, and information about reporting bugs, can be found at http://www.kernel.org/doc/man-pages/.


 

Index

NAME
DESCRIPTION
SEE ALSO
COLOPHON

This document was created by man2html using the manual pages.
Time: 17:31:11 GMT, October 23, 2013

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